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Facts & Figures

Numbers of Americans Affected by Mental Illness

  •   One in four adults−approximately 61.5 million Americans−experiences mental illness in a given year. One in 17−about 13.6 million−live with a serious mental illness such as schizophrenia, major depression or bipolar disorder.1
  •   Approximately 20 percent of youth ages 13 to 18 experience severe mental disorders in a given year. For ages 8 to 15, the estimate is 13 percent.2
  •   Approximately 1.1 percent of American adults— about 2.4 million people—live with schizophrenia.3,4
  •   Approximately 2.6 percent of American adults−6.1million people−live with bipolar disorder.4,5
  •   Approximately 6.7 percent of American adults−about14.8 million people−live with major depression.4,6
  •   Approximately 18.1 percent of American adults−about42 million people−live with anxiety disorders, such as panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder and phobias.4,7
  •   About 9.2 million adults have co-occurring mentalhealth and addiction disorders.8
  •   Approximately 26 percent of homeless adults stayingin shelters live with serious mental illness and an estimated 46 percent live with severe mental illness

    and/or substance use disorders.9

  •   Approximately 20 percent of state prisoners and 21percent of local jail prisoners have “a recent history” of

    a mental health condition.10

  •   Seventy percent of youth in juvenile justice systemshave at least one mental health condition and at least 20 percent live with a severe mental illness.11

    Getting Mental Health Treatment in America

 Approximately 60 percent of adults12, and almost one-half

NAMI • The National Alliance on Mental Illness • 1 (800) 950-NAMI • www.nami.org 3803 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 100, Arlington, VA 22203

Mental Illness FACTS AND NUMBERS of youth ages 8 to 15 with a mental illness received no

mental health services in the previous year. 13

  •   African American and Hispanic Americans usedmental health services at about one-half the rate of whites in the past year and Asian Americans at about one-third the rate.14.
  •   One-half of all chronic mental illness begins by the ageof 14; three-quarters by age 24.15 Despite effective treatment, there are long delays−sometimes decades−between the first appearance of symptoms

    16 and when people get help.

    The Impact of Mental Illness in America

     Serious mental illness costs America $193.2 billion in lost earnings per year.17

     Mood disorders such as depression are the third most common cause of hospitalization in the U.S. for both youth and adults ages 18 to 44.18

     Individuals living with serious mental illness face an

    increased risk of having chronic medical conditions.19 Adults living with serious mental illness die on average 25 years earlier than other Americans, largely due to

    treatable medical conditions.20
     Over 50 percent of students with a mental health

    condition age 14 and older who are served by special education drop out−the highest dropout rate of any

    disability group.21
     Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the U.S.

    (more common than homicide) and the third leading cause of death for ages 15 to 24 years.22 More than 90 percent of those who die by suicide had one or more

    mental disorders.23
     Although military members comprise less than 1

    percent of the U.S. population24, veterans represent 20 percent of suicides nationally. Each day, about 22 veterans die from suicide.25

Mental Illness FACTS AND NUMBERS

References

1 National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health. (n.d.). Statistics: Any Disorder Among Adults. Retrieved March 5, 2013, from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/statistics/1ANYDIS_ADULT.shtml
2 National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health. (n.d.). Any Disorder Among Children. Retrieved March 5, 2013, from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/statistics/1ANYDIS_CHILD.shtml

3 National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health. (n.d.) The Numbers Count: Mental Disorders in America. Retrieved March 5, 2013, from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/the-numbers-count-mental-disorders-in-america/index.shtml
4 Prevalence numbers were calculated using NIMH percentages (cited) and 2010 Census data. Census data is available at: United States Census Bureau. (revised 2011). “USA [State & County QuickFacts].” Retrieved March 5, 2013, from http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/00000.html 5 National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health. (n.d.). The Numbers Count: Mental Disorders in America. Retrieved March 5, 2013, from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/the-numbers-count-mental-disorders-in-america/index.shtml

6 Ibid.
7 National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health. (n.d.). Statistics: Any Anxiety Disorder Among Adults. Retrieved March 5, 2013, from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/statistics/1anyanx_adult.shtml
8 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2012). Results from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings NSDUH Series H-42, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 11-4667). Rockville, Md.: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2012.
9 U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Community Planning and Development. (2011). The 2010 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress. Retrieved March 5, 2013, from http://www.hudhre.info/documents/2010HomelessAssessmentReport.pdf
10 Glaze, L.E. & James, D.J. (2006, updated December). Mental Health Problems of Prison and Jail Inmates. Bureau of Justice Statistics Special Report. U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs Washington, D.C. Retrieved March 5, 2013, from http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub/pdf/mhppji.pdf
11 Skowyra, K.R. & Cocozza, J.J. (2007) Blueprint for Change: A Comprehensive Model for the Identification and Treatment of Youth with Mental Health Needs in Contact with the Juvenile Justice System. The National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice; Policy Research Associates, Inc. The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Delmar, N.Y: The National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice; Policy Research Associates, Inc.
12Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2012). Results from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings NSDUH Series H-42, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 11-4667). Rockville, Md.; Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2012.
13 National Institute of Mental Health. (n.d.). Use of Mental Health Services and Treatment Among Children. Retrieved March 5, 2013, from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/statistics/1NHANES.shtml
14 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2010). 2010 National Healthcare Disparities Report. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. Retrieved January 2013, from http://www.ahrq.gov/research/findings/nhqrdr/nhdr10/index.html.
15 Kessler, R.C, et al. (2005). Lifetime prevalence and age-of-onset distributions of DSM-IV disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Archives of General Psychiatry, 62(6), 593-602.
16 National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health. (2005). Mental Illness Exacts Heavy Toll, Beginning in Youth. Retrieved March 5, 2013, from http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/jun2005/nimh-06.htm
17 Insel, T.R. (2008). Assessing the Economic Costs of Serious Mental Illness. The American Journal of Psychiatry. 165(6), 663-665.
18 Wier, LM (Thompson Reuters), et al. HCUP facts and figures: statistics on hospital-based care in the United States, 2009. Web.. Rockville, Md. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2011. Retrieved March 5, 2013, from http://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/reports.jsp.
19 Colton, C.W. & Manderscheid, R.W. (2006). Congruencies in increased mortality rates, years of potential life lost, and causes of death among public mental health clients in eight states. Preventing Chronic Disease: Public Health Research, Practice and Policy, 3(2), 1-14.
20 Parks, J.,et al. (2006). Morbidity and Mortality in People with Serious Mental Illness. Alexandria, VA: National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD) Medical Directors Council.
21 U.S. Department of Education. (2006). Twenty-eighth annual report to Congress on the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 2006, Vol. 2. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education.
22 McIntosh, J.L.. & Drapeau, C.W. (for the American Association of Suicidology). (2012). U.S.A. suicide: 2010
official final data. Washington, D.C: American Association of Suicidology.
23 American Association of Suicidology. (2012). Suicide in the USA Based on 2010 Data. Washington, DC: American Association of Suicidology. 24 Martinez, L. & Bingham, A. (2011). U.S. Veterans: by the Numbers. Retrieved March 5, 2013, from http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/us- veterans-numbers/story?id=14928136
25 U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Mental Health Services, Suicide Prevention Program. (2013). Suicide Data Report, 2012. Retrieved March 5, 2013, from http://www.va.gov/opa/docs/Suicide-Data-Report-2012-final.pdf

NAMI • The National Alliance on Mental Illness • 1 (800) 950-NAMI • www.nami.org 3803 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 100, Arlington, VA 22203

Reviewed by Ken Duckworth, M.D., March 2013

Mental Illness FACTS AND NUMBERS

NAMI • The National Alliance on Mental Illness • 1 (800) 950-NAMI • www.nami.org 3803 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 100, Arlington, VA 22203

 

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